Voi. XXX

W|jg IPdMUMI,© !3'Y *

ORANGE JUDD 8.CO

2 4 5 BROA DW/\Y,

Kllllli

I

[January,

AMERICAN AGRICULTURIST.

1871.]

THE AMERICAN

.MimnilU ANNUAL

FOR 1871.

A YEAR-BOOK

WANTED BA EVERYBODY.

This valuable Year-Book has now reached its fifth number. In its general features it follows the plan of the four numbers that have preceded it.

It contains besides the review of the year, a record of Inventions affecting Agriculture ; Progress in Dairy Mat¬ ters, by Gardner B. Weeks; Progress in Agricultural Education ; Veterinary Matters, by Dr. John Busteed ; Leguminous Forage-Plants; Mutton-Sheep in America; Progress in Fish Culture, by William Clift ; The Pneumatic Sewage System, by Dr. F. Coar ; Poultry Raised for Flesh; Agricultural Books for the Year; Farmers’ Directory, giving names of manufacturers of agricultural implements, dealers in seeds, stock, etc.

ltea.iitifii.lly Illustrated.

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Either of these Annuals for the four preceding years may be had at the same prices.

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NEW AMERICAN FARM BOOK.

Originally by Hit-Hard L, Allen. Revised and greatly enlarged by Lewis F. Allen. Price $2.50.

Allen's American Farm Book has been one of the standard farmers' hand-books for twenty years; it is still a valuable book, but. not up to the times; and as its author, Mr.Ii.L. Allen, could not give time to its revision, tills was undertaken by his brother. Hon. Lewis F. Allen, the distinguished farmer of Erie countv. editor of the American Shorthorn Herd- Book. The work is greatly enlarged, and full of suggestions from the rich experience of its editor and reviser, and is called the New American Farm Book.

HARRIS ON THE PIG.

Breeding. Rearing, Management, and Improvement. With numerous Illustrations. By Joseph Harris. Price, $1.50.

This is the only American treatise upon the breeding, rearing, and management of swine, and is by one thorough¬ ly familiar with the whole subject. The points of the various English and American breeds are thoroughly discussed, and tlie great advantage of using thorough-bred males clearly shown. The work is equally valuable to the farmer who keeps but few pigs, and to the breeder on an extensive scale.

Either of the above books sent post-paid on receipt of ■price by

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THE AMERICAN A WOKLD-WIDE NEWSPAPER.

FOR 1871.

A YEAR-BOOK

FOR EVERY HOME,

Tlie fifth number of this beautiful serial is now ready. It presents reports upon the various departments of horticulture. Dr. J. A. Warder writes upon Apples; P. Barry gives ail account of New Pears; Charles Downing and F. R. Elliott treat of New Peaches; A. S. Fuller gives a full account of Small Fruits; O'. L. Allen has an article on New Bulbs ; Peter Henderson tells of the New Bedding and Other Plants. Besides these, there are valuable treatises, among which are those on Orange Culture in Florida, by Samuel B. Parsons; Raising Nursery-Trees from Seed, by Thomas Meehan; Dwarf Evergreens, by Josiaii IIoopes; various tables, summaries, and other useful matter by the Editor, in¬ cluding a list of the principal seedsmen, nurserymen, and florists in the United States.

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For sale by all seedsmen and by CEO. E. WAKING, Jr., Ogden Farm, Newport, K. I. (Send for Circular.)

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Others may know as little about our lands and State, and to such, and all who are thinking of emigrating and build¬ ing up lor themselves homes on the rich "rolling Prairies of tlie Western States, I say don’t go beyond until you have looked at tlie lands of

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PEACH CULTURE^

Illustrated. By J:imcs Alexander Fulton. Price, $1.50.

Among tlie fruits, the Peach , if not the most, is one of the most important of all. It is so easily raised, comes into bearing so soon, and is so delicious, as well as beautiful, it is impossible that it should not be a favorite. Living in the very center of the peach-growing district ; sharing the com¬ mon interest felt in the subject; deeply impressed with its importance to the individual planters themselves, and also to the community at large; and believing that alasting bene¬ fit could be doiie to both, the author lias been induced to prepare this work on peach culture.

CRANBERRY CULTURE.

Illustrated. By Joseph J. White. Price, $1.25.

Tlie author of this work has aimed to embody, in a plain and concise manner, all the useful and practical facts which study and experience have yielded to the inquiring cran¬ berry grower of the present time. The business has in¬ creased enormously within the last ten years, and knowledge and experience have kept pace with that increase.

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V VU f V V V'V 9

JS?“ The stars (*) in the follow¬ ing Index show where engravings occur. Articles referring directly or indirectly to Bees , Cattle , Insects , Manures , 75ws, efc.,

found indexed under these general, heads.

A

Accomplishments . 345

Acre, Number of Feet in an . 44G

Advertisements, About Editorial, 248— Cheap, 5— Reliable, 5— Where Seen, 8.

Advertising— Another Good Me¬ dium, 46.

Air-Line Railroad . * . 47

Alfalfa . 287

Answer through the Papyr .126 Antelope Hunting on the Plains. 60

Apple-Parings, Dried . . 464

Apples— Cordon, 183— Orchard, 291

Apple-Trees, Non-Bearing . 366

Asbestos Roofing . 126

Ashes, 174— Leached and Unleach¬ ed, 322— Lime and Guano, W'hen to Apply, 447 Time to Apply, 407— With Bones, 46— For Wheat, 406.

Auctions . 447

Axles; Oiling . 457

B

Balance Sheet . .170

Balsam— Pears and Apples _ *..462

Barley vs. Oats for Food . <?,;126

Basin, Draining a . 367

Baskets . *. .185

Beaus— Asparagus, 382— Lima, 382.

Beef, Buffalo . 42-86

Beet, Egyptian . 302

Beet-Leaves, Sour-Keep for . 369

Bells upon Sheep . 207

Bee Notes, 10-169-248-288-327-369 408-447.

Birds— American Magpie, *53— Auk, The Great, '253— Cow - Bunting, * 451— Owl, How to Catch, 98- Snowy and Others, *140— Robin, What to do witli the, 223.

Bird Dogs, Training., . 6

Black Bear, Trapping the . *.. 94

Black Walnuts . 122

Blocks, To Prevent Splitting . 326

Boats, Cost of . 327

Boat, How to Build a . *. .297

Bones, a Great Waste, 379— Dust, 134— Grease from, 446-Mills, *417 —Utilizing, 457.

Bonnets, Sun . 185

Books, Agricultural, 447— Agricul¬ tural Annual for 1871, 129— Archi¬ tecture, New Work on, 406— Ayr¬ shire Herd-Book, 409 Bicknell’s Village Builder,” Supplement to, 445 Children's, 463 Botanical Works, Gray’s, 127— Cattle Club, Register of Am. Jersey, 328— Com¬ missioner of Agriculture, Report of, 8— Common-Sense in the House¬ hold, 325 Forest Trees, New Work on, 446— Guide to N.Y.City, Traveler's, 409— Horse and Horse¬ manship of U. S. and British Prov¬ inces, 126— Money in ttie Garden, 126— My Summer in a Garden, 7— The First Book of Botany, 246— The Practical Poultry-Keeper, 90.

Boot-Jacks, Fashions in . *..145

Bottle, Dosing . . *..216

Boys and Ginns’ Columns.

A About Donkeys, 107 About Walking, 27 A Cheap Ele¬ phant. 68— An Icicle, 27 ANew Year’s Greeting, 27 Aunt Sue's Puzzle -Box. *27- *67- *107 - *147 - *187-*227-*267-*307 - B *347-*387-*427-*406 - Bears, the Doctor Talks about, *417-8— C Bees, Among the, 187— Christ¬ mas Presents, '465 Churns F and Bottles, 337 -Farmer or Doctor, 307 Fishing, 227

G Garden, Let ns have a, 147 II Gulls, a Trick of, '466— Have a

l Solid Foundation, 108— Icicle Prizes, 108-147-148 - Indians, the Doctor Talks about, 466— J Insects as Musicians, 307 Just

M Hatched, *228 Making Mud- Sf Pies, *348— Note from Carle- P ton,” 147 -- Proposition from

R the Doctor,- 465— Rats, Ingenu¬

ity of, *2C7— Red River Trains, S 313-Setting Traps, 267— Street-

Shows in London, 427— Sum- T mer and Winter, 388 -Tempt¬ ing Good Nature, *308 The April Shower, *148— The First Smoke, *28— Tobacco, a Speech V for "Boys, 348— Visit to Mount W Vesuvius, 66-Waiting for a Bite, *268— What 1 Saw from the City of York, 27— Winter in the Country, 28 -Woods in May, the, *188.

Brick-Clay. . 407

Bricks and Leather- . 440

Bridal Gifts . 25

Brooms for Stables . *..293

Brush, to Subdue . 58

Buckwheat, 208 Plowing Under, 408— Thrashing, 287.

Buildings Barn, Mr. Sargent’s, *455-456 Barns, Tight and Well Ventilated, 131— Barn-Yards, Pav¬ ing, *416— New Cattle-Shed at Og¬ den Farm, *17— Plan for House, No. 28, *88.

Bushes, to Kill Dew-Berry . 326

Butter— Coloring, 51-251 Experi¬ menting with, 251 and Feed, Prices of, 410— from Devonshire Cream, 218-How much Salt in, 8— How to make Good, 217— Making, 146-287 Making in Winter, 59- Packing and Preserving, 365 Price of, 448— Soft, 328.

Buttons . 464

By Express or by Post, . 345-

c

Cabbages— Early, and Cauliflowers, etc., 209— and Onions, 409— Wake¬ field, lor Seed, 343.

Cactuses, Hardy .

Cactuses in Winter . "*wii*

Canning, Questions about . 306

Carrots and Onions on Sandy Land, 287.

Carrots, Planting, 251 Wild, 865

Carvers, Hints to . 145

Catalogues . 365

Cats, Curing . 417

Cattle— and Hogs In Ill., 207— Best Breed, 206— Breachy, 1®— Careful Selection of, 171 Eating Dry Earth, 364- -Feeding, 171— Grow¬ ing, 448— Hereford, *413— Ho1 stein, *401 Jersey or Alderney, 167- Shorthorns, 29S— Shorthorns, Higli Price, 328 Soiling, 171— Soiling in Ill., 17 Thorough-bred, High Price, 176— Tying, 171 -Value of Bran for, 95 Water in Winder, 90 -Bulls-- Color of, 250 Jersey, “Wachusett,” *201— Calves— Don’t Sell the Best, 29S— Four at a Birth. 248 Hide-Bound, 285 Mother's Milk for, 338— Raising for Milkers, 379— Wintering Young, 131— Cows —Brittany, Bessie,” *299— Card¬ ing, 175 Cost of Koeping, 11- Drying up, 45G--Feeding Milch, 203 Food before Calving, 82— Hard-Milking. 236-321-How much Land to Keep, 447— Kerry, 1 68 Leaking. Milk, 282-Milk for In¬ fants. 106-Milk Mirror in, 209- Milk-Mirror in Jersey, 456 - Plantation, 238 Preventing Hold¬ ing up Milk, ’285— Selection of Dairy, 168 to make Milk in Winter, 47 •— Heifers -Gooi\ Jer¬ sey Grade, 47 “Thrift,” 371 -- When to Dry, 6- -Oxen— Trial of Working, *411 —Working, *337 Steers -Breaking in Young, 285.

Cattle, Diseases of, 131— Abortion in Cows, 136— Foot and Mouth Dis¬ ease, 9-254— Foul in the Foot, 257— Grubs, 129— Milk Fever, 130 - 206.

Cellar Floors, Water-tight . 6

Cellar, Musty . . ....S26

Cesspool, Cottage without a, *52, 128.

Chairs, High . 463

Chairs, Novel. . . *..463

Charcoal for Earth-Closets . 166

Cheap Money . . 47

Cheese-Making . 323

Cheese-Press . *. .253

Chemistry on the Farm . 94

Children’s Shoulder-Straps . 305

Cider and Cider-Presses . 401

Cions, Cutting . . 286-366

City Guests in the Country . 265

Clover, 247— Bringing in, 137— Hay, Curing, 134— Management of, 219— for Dairy Purposes, 207— for Hog Pasture, 7— for Plowing Under, 333— Means of Fertility, 335— on Poor Soil, 254— Seed, How to Clean, 407— Seeding to, 374— Sow¬ ing, 367 Value of, 129 With Corn, 325.

Coal . 453

Coal- Ashes for Earth-Closets . . .137

Commission Merchants . 23

Composts . 208

Compost Heap, Turning a . * 97

Compost of Muck, Lime, ete . S67

Composting Muck, Ashes, and Cot¬ ton Seed, 408.

Congress and Horticulture. . . 22

Consulting Agriculturist . 126

Corn, 285 -Chester Co. Mammoth, 248-Judson's Branching, 461 Moore’s Concord, 160— Red, 247— Cultivating, 209-326 Cribs and Grain-Bins, *338 -How Much Cana Man Husk, 59-163 -Husks, 327- Fine, 367— Felder, 169-206— Cur¬ ing, 219-288— Feeding Fo lder, 287 —Green, S46 Growing, 131— Eat¬ ing Green, S06— Harvesting, *&J6 Planting- Question, 175— and Po¬ tatoes, Rolling Land for, 447— Rais ihg Unprofitable, 51 Stalks, Burning, 46.

Cotton-Seed Meal..:.. . ....

Cotton- Wood Bark for. Forage, Gathering, *340.

Covering, Early. .. . 459

Cranberry Bogs, Depth of Cover¬ ing, 63— Wh ‘re to Look for, 263- Lands, 168.

Cream-Cooling Apparatus _ *. .216

Criticisms . 285

Crops— Clean Culture, 335 Fodder, 365 in Virginia, 284— Kansas, 8 and Prices, 408-446— Secured, 871— that, will Stand Drouth, 89—' Three in one Season, 101.

Cross Children, Treatment of _ 345

Drying Fruit, Corn, etc . 345

Dyking Swamp Land . 56

E

Earth from under Old Houses. . .168

Earth System, Progress of . 139

Edging, a Silver-Grny . 261

Egg-Beaters . . . *..425

Egg-Plants, S81— Experience witli, 460.

Engineering, Civil . 40S

Eumelan, Pronunciation of ... .366 Experience, Telling One’s . 460

Fairs, List of, 253-251— Louisiana, 126 —Jersey, 208— New England, 365- Oxford, Pa., 287.

Fallowing, Fall . 14-167

Fall Planting of Hardy Plants. . .343 Farm Experience, 370— Help, Pay for, 453— Improvements, Profit¬ able, 369— Kansas, Worn-Out, 326- Laborers in Winter, Work for, 453 —Run-Down, R. I., 128.

Fa’-mer, a Good .

. 452

Farmer or Carpenter .

. 166

Farmers’ Clubs .

. 1285

Farmers, Hard Times for

. 867

Farming— Does it Pay?

208 Eng-

Crows. Hoodwinking .

....*..453

Cucumbers,

Early .

. 183

Cultivating

by Steam .

. 457

Cultivation

Thorough... .

. 291

Currant and Gooseberry Trees., 341 Curry-Combs, 235— and Brushes, 166 —and Cards, 407.

Dairymen's Convention . 8

Daisy, Oxeye . .408

Dangerous Light . . 8

Daughters, Teach your . 1S6

Deer, Tame . 167

Dishes. Washing . 146-226

Ditching, Is it Farm Work . 46

Docks and Elders . 7.826

Docks, How to Kill . 211

Doctor, Good Advice from . 349

Don't ! . SO

Dough, Turning Pour . 3S5

Drains, 175— Shallow, Belter than None, 90.

Drainage in Scotland . 299

Dry Earth in Veterinary Surgery, 339.

lish, 175— High, 91 -on West Coast of Mexico, 447 -Swedish Dairy, 178.

Fences, 379— Cheap Ttyo-rail, 178 - Portable, 1S7-* 337— Wire. 247-325- 407— Wire and Board, 327.

Fertilizer, Shade a.... . 326

Fertilizers, Mineral . *. .218

Fire in Chicago . 409

Fires in Michigan and Wisconsin.409 Fish— Alewife, * 291— Bass, Fresh- Water, 188— Breeding, Will it Pay? 168— Pickerel Shooting, * 133- Sturgeons and their Products, * 173.

Fish-Pond, Making a . 419

Flax . . . 867

Florist, How to Become a . 423

Florists and Nurserymen’s Black- List, 63.

Florist, Wants to be a . 163

Flower Garden and Lawn in Jan., 4— Feb., 43-March, 83-April, 124 —May, 163— June, 203— July, 244— Aug., 231-Sept., 324— Oct., 864— Nov., 404— Dec., 443.

Flower Seeds, Collecting . 262

Flowers— Abut ilon striatum, 365— Anemonesmnl Ranunculuses, 183,

* 424 -Antirrhinum, 143— Azalea Indica, 142— Banksian Rose, 144— Bulbocodium, 183— Bulbs, Hardy,

* 381-Canna Indica, 143— Carna¬ tions for Winter Flowering, 262— Christmas Rose, 461— Climbers, Annual, 184— Coba?a scandens, 143 —Coleus, 143— Crimson and White Mignonette, 459— Diantlius, 143— Dicentra spectabilis alba, 262- Double Zinnias, 143— Dwarf Cor¬ nel, * 181— Garland Flower, 262— Fraxineila, * S04 Geranium, Double, 416— Geraniums, Keep¬ ing, 461— Lantana, 143 Lilac-' flowered Fuchsia, * 21— Lobelias, 143 Myrsiphyllum, 142 Pansy, 143 Basque Flower, 261— Per¬ forate-leaved Seim lapsus, * 101- Petunias, 143 - - Roses, Winter Flowering, *181— Salvia splendens, 143— Snow - Drops, 424— Spiraea callosa, 303- Trailing Arbutus, * 181— Trilliums, * 3 14— Tuberose, a New, 803— Variegated Crown Im¬ perial, * 221 ' Verbenas, 143-Ver¬ benas, Self-sown, 18:5 Violets, 446 —Yellow Asphodel,* SOS— Yucca filamentosa, 19— Zonal Geraniums, 143.

Fly-Brush, Patent . S4«

Fodder— How to use Com, 373 Steaming and Cutting, 139.

Foliage, Autumn Colors of . 423

Food— A Baby’s First, !S5 - How

much Required, 128 Steaming,

92-369.

Fruit Growing about Leavenworth,

422.

Fruit, Large Collections of, 383- Pears in Orchard Culture, S83— Selling by Weight, 461.

Fruit-Trees in Gardens . 208

Fruit Garden, Jan. ,8— Feb., 43- March, 83— April, 123— May, 163— June, 203 J uly, 2-13-Aug., 283- Sent., 823 Oct., 363 Not., 403- Dec., 443.

Fumigator for Plants and Poultry, * 296.

c

Garden— Drainage for, 328— How to have a Good, * 102— Preparing Land for, 89— Trenching a, 406.

Gardeners, Be Just to . . 883

Gardening in Iowa . 222

Garget and Bitter Cream . 288

Gas-Lime . . . 409

Gate, -Farm . 825

Gate Posts, . .*..836

Glades of the Alleghanies _ _ ,.7

Glycerine . ; _ 287

Graft, Prolific . ....246

Grain— Rolling Spring, 446— Thrash Early, 259.

Grand Enterprises, One of the. ... .5

Grapes . 802-882

Grape Culture, Hints on . . . . . 63

Grape Cuttings in Clay Soil. . ; . . .142 Grapes in Virginia, 122— Mildew on, 803-Native, 409-Sending. 409- Tendr'ls, S03— Training, 808— Va¬ rieties of, S02.

Grape-vine, the, 113 -Pinching the, 246.

Grass Blue, 216 Buffalo,* 261- Cocoa orNut, 246— Couch or Quack 419— for Mountain Land in N. J., 825— How to get Land into, 287 —Hungarian and Corn Fodder, 47 —in Summer Fallow, 826— Job’s Tears, *21— June or Bine, 365— Seed Sowing, 251— Seeding in the Fall, 247— Fall Meadow Oat, * 104— Tim¬ othy in Pennsylvania, 168— Tim¬ othy on Stubble, 326.

Grassing a Terrace or Bank. . . . . .103 Grater, a devolving, * 225— Mistake about, 366.

Graters . ...*..385

Grazing, Winter . 415

Greenhouse, a Cheap, * SOI- * 341- Building, a, 284— and Hot-honse Plants from Seed, 112— Plants, Specimen,* 884— and Window Plants in Jan. 8— Feb. 43— March 83— April, 124— May, 163— June, 203 —July, 241— August, 234— Sept. 824— Oct., 364— Nov., 401— Dec., 443. Grindstone Frame and Trough *.256

Ground Ivy and Red Roo; . 414

Guano . ......247

Gypsum . 7

Habits to Cultivate in Sousi. .’...{ 9 Hams, to Preserve from Files... .665

Harness, Care of . .’. . . .’288

Harrowing for Different. Effects..29S Hay— Curing, 247— Curing i Q'oyer, 247— Price of, 447— Substitutes for, 259— 1 Timothy, 247 to Cure Lit- cern, 367.

Hay-Rack for Farm Wagon...-.*.. 217

Hearth and Home, Fiction . 445

Hedge, How to Make a, 46’.— Under Trees, 166.

Hedging, Successful . 882

Help Wanted . 86

Hickory Farm Adornments .. 62

Hide, How to Strip a . 456

Hive, How to Make a Simple . 139

HogPen, Plan lor . 167

Home Doctoring. . . 66

Home Topics, 185-225-265-305-345- 886-163.

nomes in Kansas . 127

Hoop Poles . 166-207

r

V

CL

INDEX.

Ill

Horses— Colts, Management of, 208 -Colt, Weak Knees, 867— Aprons for, *256— Cone Spavin, 206— Bots In, 250— Broken-Winded, 247— Colic In, 247— Fast- Walking, 247— Eye, Film on, 7— Feeding according to Work, 207— Galls on, 435— Glan¬ ders, 407— Grease for Galls on, 455 —Hitching a,* 136— in Summer, 255 Interfering, 867— Percheron, 163— Pin Worms In, 7— Prevailing Dis¬ ease among, 245— Slobbering, 407 Sprain of Back Sinews, 447— Stal¬ lion Clydesdale, * 161— Stallion Lexington, Thorough-bred * 321 Stallion Thorough-bred, 290— Sur¬ feit, 407— Teeth, * 96— that will not Lead, 285— Three Abreast on a Mowing Machine, 89— Worts, 206 Horse-shoe, how to Replace..*. ..296 Hortl. Memoranda from Tennessee, 142.

Hot-bed covered with Muslin _ 215

Household Department, 25-65-105- 145-185-225-265-305-345-385-125-463. House and Barn from Plans \n Ag¬ riculturist, 46.

Housekeeper, Letter from, 385-426- 464.

Housekeeping, System in . 25

House-Plants . 22

How a Monarch Dies . 262

Humbugs, Silver-Plating Peddlers. 5 Humbugs, Sundry, 5-45-86-127 166- 206-245-285-327-365-405 446.

"Hybrid between a Rabbit and a Cat, 208.

I

Ice, Economy in . 266

Ice, How to Store . 92

Ice-Houses. Ventilation of . 407

Ice-House with Cool Room,* 417418

Immigrant, Colorado . 413

Implements— Care of, 457— Essen¬ tial, 223 -How to Introduce, 166- Barn- Barrow for Fodder, * 256 - Clod Crusher, Cheap, * 97— Corn- Husking Machine, 128-207-287— Cultivator, Comstock’s Hand, 127 Cultivator, Useful Hand, * 461 narrow, * 177— A Triangular, 202 ^Shares vs. Nlshwitz, 47- -Tho¬ mas’s Smoothing, 131-287-444— Horse-powers, « 136 - Husking Pin, A, * 299— Liquid Manure ■Spreader, * 377 Pile Driver, Simple, * 376 —Ploio, Double Fur¬ row, 207— English Double Furrow, * 177-Gang, 168-247— Snow, 454 —Swivel for Level Land, 6— What is best Subsoil ? 46— Plowing by Steam, * 457458— Potato-Digger, Horse, 327— Roller and Marker, Combined, * 182 -Scraper, A, * 217 —Stone Moving, * 257— Tussocks, Cutting, * 256.

Insects— Ants, to Destroy, 328— Bark Louse. 208— Bugs and Bugologlsts, 883— Bugs, Cucumber, 246 Cab¬ bage Maggot and Caterpillar. 303 Cabbage Pest, 223 -- Cabbage Pest, Southern, 409 Cabbage Worm, 133 Cureulio, Plum, 383- Currant Worm, 203 Currant Worms, 208-287— Currant Worms, Tansy for, 248— Fleas, 286— Gas Lime for, S25— Gigantic Rhinoce¬ ros Beetle, * 21 -Grain Moth, 248 —Grapes, Insects on, 303— Great White Leopard-Moth, * 459— Green Fly on the Quince, 237— Meat-Flies and Fly-Blows, * 213— Mosquitoes, Heading off, 306 --Peach Borer, Remedy for, 14D2G3— Potato Bugs, 207-245-246 Red Spider, 262-Rose Slugs and Green Fiy, 126— Slugs, Green, 366— Sweet - Potato Bug, 245 Vine Insec’s, 382 - Weevil, Barn, 166.

Inventors, Something to Consider, 22.

Ironing Board, An . *..265

Ironing Made Easy . 186

Irrigate, When and Where . 98

K

Kansas, Letter from . S78

Keeping Accounts . 59

Kindergarten . . . 185-305

Kitchen Garden, Jan., 3— Feb., 43- March, 83— April, 123— May, 1C3 June, 203— July, 213-Aug., 283- Sept., 323 Oct., 363 Nov., 403- Dec., 443.

F nee-Breeches . 315

Labels . 183

Lactometer, A . 237

Ladder, Fruit., . . . *. .295

Lamp, German Student’s . *..65

Lands— For Market and Fruit Gar- dens, 168— In Iowa, 129— Seeding, 211— To Restore Worn-out, 408- Where to Locate, 168.

Layering, Summer . . . 263

Leaves . 367

Lettuce for Next Spring . 344

Leveling Instrument, Cheap ...126

Life Insurance Companies . 405

Lightning as a Landscape Gar¬ dener, 461.

Like Begets Like . 98

Lima Beans, Field Culture of _ 221

Lime and Lime Kilns, * 335— and Sand in Mortar, Proportion of, 447— Best Time to Haul, 446— for Fruit-trees and Land, 407— Gas, 16S— in a Compost Heap, 82— Old Slaked, 162— In Corn Stubble, 247— on Oat Stubble, 287 -vs. Ashes, 287

Looking Ahead.. . 375

Love Powders,” . 406

Lucern . 408

Luccrn in California . .415

Lunches . . . .186

Madder . 87

Managing a Farm . 11

Mangels, Sowing . 126-211

Manure, 57-373— and Bran, 452— and Labor, More, and Less Land. 38; Apple Pomace, 326— on a Steep Hill, 404— Barn-yard, Management of, 18— Bone, 325— Buying, 167 - Composting of, !5 -Corn-stalks for, 54— Cotton Seed vs. Plaster,

167— Escape of Ammonia in, 174 for Chinch-Bugs in Wheat, 325- Gathering Sea-Weed for, * 353- Heaps, Piaster In, 46— in Hlinois, 215— Lime for, 326 -Night Soil, 167 —on Wheat Stubble, 15— Peat or Turf as, 407— Peruvian Guano, Lasting, 20— Guano or Poudrctte,

166 - Poultry, 167 Pumps for Liquid, 339— Relative Value o'. 367-Rich, 170-Salt Fish as, 247- Sawdust, Bono Meal, and Ashesi 326 -Secret, 6— Spreading from Cart, 18 Swamp Mud Ashes,

168- Value of, 452 -Value of Sea- Weed for, 866 -What to Mix with, 128-Worth of, 71.

Manuring Cheap Lands . 247

Maple Sugar Item, 87— Making. .* 49

Maps, Lloyds' . 366

Market Days . 175

Market-Gardening In the Rural Districts, 142.

Market Reports— Jan., 4— Feb., 44- March, 85— April, 124 May, 165 June, 203— July, 244— August, 231- Sept., 824— Oct., 364— Nov., 401- Dec.,444.

Mari, Green Sand . 237

Marsh Lands, Improvement of.. 247

Meal, How Much Oil . 447

Meat, How to ChooBe. . 145

Mechanical Engineering in Tale, i

Men, Hiring by the Month . 46

Messrs. B. Fox & Co . 207

Mice on Fruit-Trees . 47

Milk, Bloody, 207-218-Can, Tron- Clad, 126 - Holding Back, 367 - Pans, Cleansing, 327— Pans, Deep, 410— Rooms, 129-165 - Setting for Cream, 290— Setting in Summer,

167 - Temperature of Spring House for, 327 Weight of a Qwart, 456.

Mills, Bone . 206

Minerals and Fossils . 7

Mink Breeding . 7

Missouri Farm, How to Manage..3G9 Modern Cooking, Brown Bread.. 26 Moon, Influence on the Weather. 18

Muck, Getting Out . 214

Mud, Salt Marsh,' as a Fertilizer..‘29G

Mulching . 223

Mules for Farm Work . 16

Murder . 366

Muskrat, Trapping the . *. . 93

Mustard Seed— Harvesting . 135

Mutton, How lo have Good, 138— to get Rid of Woolly Taste in, 446— Woolly Taste in, 367.

Names and Numbers . 262

Neatness, Unprincipled . 186

Newspaper Club Agencies . 87

New United States Loan . 126

Night-Gowns . 886

Night-Soil . 167

Notes from the Pines, 23-183-261-302 813-382-460.

N otice— Special . 285

Oatmeal Gruel . 345

Oats— Norway, 168-325— Plowing in for Manure, 87— With Wheat,. .418 Obituary Notice— Sanford Howard, 126.

Ogden Farm Papers, No. 13, 11— No. 14, 50-No 15, 91 -No. 16, 130— No. 17, 170-No. 18, 209-No. 19, 251- No 20, 290-No. 24, 370-No. 22, 410 -No. 23, 447.

Onions . 23

Onion Sets . 166

Orchard and Nursery for Jan., 3— Feb., 43-March, 83— April, 123- May, 163— June, 203— July, 2-13— Aug., 283— Sept., 823- Oct., 863— Nov., 403— Dec., 443.

Orchard, A Neglected, 286— Apple and Pear, 409— Pasturing, 135— Re¬ cord, 143.

Osage Orange, 866, 446— Seed, 143.

Osiers . 167

Ox, Musk . 173

Pails, Painted . 86:

Parsley, Dried . 426

Parsnips . 461

Pasturing M adows, or Toung Clo¬ ver, 289.

Patching and Darning Exhibition, 8-9-87— *105.

Peach es. ...... i .. r _ , . . .806

Peach— A New Early . 245

Peanuts— Harvesting . 287

Pears Cracking . 407

Pear— Japan, * 462— Sheldon, 460- Tree. Big, 382 Trees in a Gar¬ den, 167— Winter, 461.

Peas. 166-303 Brushing, 167-208 - Harvesting, 327— On Sod Land, 207

—For Green Manure . 247

Peatr.r r. .- r.-rw. z.^.TXTV. . . .... .-446

Peat for Fuel . 57

Peddlers— How to Head off . 8

Periodicals American Agricultu¬ rist, or Hearth and Home. 126— American Journal of Science, Mon., 47 Chicago, 409 Poultry Paper, New, 248— ’• Prairie Far¬ mer,” 497--" The Southern Far¬ mer,” 246.

Peter Henderson & Co . 2-18

Petroleum— Early Days of the Busi¬ ness, * 179.

“Pheasants and Poultry” . 8

Phosphate, South Carolina . 288

Pigeons, Sterile Fan-Tai! . 8G9

Pig Question, The . 294

Pine-Cone Oak-Gait . *.. 24

Plants— Tlie Arrow-Head, * 264— Arundo Ilonax. 343 - Canada Snakeroot, * 221— Checkerberry, * 181— Golden Rod, 365 Iron weed, S67— Ladies’ Tresses. * 424 -Mal¬ lows— Low, 40S— Milkweed, How to Kill, 287 -Netjle, Great, 409— Partridge-berry, * 131— Partridge- Pea, * 421 - Two-lea ved Solo¬ mon’s Seal, * 261 Virginian 1 Agave, * 421 -Wild Pink, * 264- Winter, State of, 461— And Flow¬ ers, How Grown, 9 61 -And Seeds by Mail, 423— For a Small Green¬ house, 421-422— For Winter, 344 Named, 126-409.

Plaster, 287— How Much per Acre, 90— On Potatoes, 246 Purity of, i 207— On Wheat, -247.

Playthings for Children . 266

Plowing, Benefits o' Fall, 375- Corn Stubbie in Fall, 419— Sod | Land for Corn,' 417— Under Clover ! vs. Feeding it Off, 167 Oat Stub¬ ble. F4.

Plums— Black-Knot, . 7

Pocket- Knife -ihiltum in Parvo, *

1 123.

I Po .en . 287

j Pomegranate . 167

| Poppy Culture . 285

| Pork. Mess . 178

Pork, Sweet . 327

Posts, Locust for . 246

Posts, Portable Clothes-Drying, * 225.

Potatoes and Corn, How to Unload. 46 Culture of, 134— for Cattle, 211 —Grafting, 21- -Growing to Tops, 217— “Late Rose,” 460— on New Ground, 217— on Sod, 326—“ Peer¬ less,” 407-460.

Poultry, Cf/tarrh In, 47— Chicken Cholera, 207 Chicken Coop, Folding, *455 Chickens, Fatten¬ ing, 167— Chickens, Gapes in, 126— Duck’s Egg, Large, 167— Egg, Curious Peahen’s, 366— Eggs, Large, 168-207-409— Keeping, 865- Preserving, 46-406 Spurious for Hatching, 207 Egg Farm , *169- * 209-* 257-* 291-* 831-* 372-* 448 - Fowls, Canker of Head and Mouth in, 126— Caponizing, 7— Diseased, 207— Dark Brahma. 207— for Ex¬ hibition, 445— for Town Dwellers, 864— Light Brahma, 248— Poisoned by Lead, 6 -Winning the Agricul¬ turist Prize-Cups, *99— Hatching, Artificial, 248— Hens, Bones for, 166 —To Prevent Sitting, 325— Large Establishment, 46— Poultry Clubs, Exhibition. N. E , 126— Delaware State Society, 7— Disease in, 369- House and Grapery-combined, *175 —Hybrids among -Domestics, *133 Importation of, 16S Lice on, 306 -407— New Variety of Buff Cochins, 253— Raising on a Large Scale, 7— Poultry Yard— Appliances, *16- *56.

Practical Studies for a Young Woman, 305.

Primitive Agriculture . *.. 13

Products of Washington Ter.... 444 Prof. Agassiz Wants Carcasses. . 8

Pump for Deep Wells . 45

Pump, New Lift and Force . 415

Pump, Power of a Suction . 409

Pumpkin Seeds for Cows _ 8

Putty and Paint . 2S8

Put Water on the Stove . 9

Q

Questions, Many . 166

Quince, Chinese . *..459

Rabbits and Young Trees . 46

Railroads and Farmer's . ...128

Railroad, Northern Pacific . 447

Raisins . 168

Raisins, American . 246

Raisin-Seeder . *. .425

Rams, Hydraulic . 445

Raspberries . 126

Raspberries, Mulching . 409

Rats and Mice, How to get rid of, 46

Recommendations. Interested _ 16*

Red Root among Wheat . 251

Rennet, Saving . 325

ReprDa's . *. .380

Residence, M . Judd's . .165

Rhubarb, Forcing . 21

Riding on Horseback, No. 1,*11 - No 2.131-No 3, 171— No 4,211- No. 5, 252— No. 6, 370— No. 7, 411. Roads and Bridges, Country, *249- *329-419450.

Ronds In Quiddlctown, How they make. *330.

Rocks, Burying . i . 5S

Rockwork and Alpine Plants.* .103